Salut! Sunderland podcast: the case for Connor, the decline of Seb

Jake experiments with colour
Jake experiments with colour
Even in the Luddite bowels of the anatomy of Salut! Sunderland there is general agreement – in so far as bowels can do something like agree – that the newly introduced podcast is A Good Thing.

Stephen Goldsmith and Gareth Barker have toiled long and hard to bring you this added dimension to the amazing service contributors to this site provide (said an unbiased onlooker).

For the third of these broadcasts, Goldy and Gareth were joined by Tom Lynn, whose thoughts on all things Sunderland AFC have graced these pages, A Love Supreme, Legion of Light and, for the short time that it lived, the excellent and highly professional magazine (fanzine somehow doesn’t seem right), The Wearside Roar of which he was the editor.

For those who have not already heard it, the new podcast can be heard at: https://soundcloud.com/wise-men-say/salut-podcast-episode-3

The series as presented at Salut! Sunderland can be seen by using the appropriate category link: https://safc.blog/category/podcast/

Sadly, the conversation is dominated by pressing gloomy issues.

* What’s up with Larsson? Central midfield may not be his natural position, but it is still one in which he is regularly asked to play when on Swedish international duty.

* Has Danny Graham been unfairly criticised at a time when even Steven Fletcher, now injured of course, has been misfiring?

* Is there a genuine lack of natural ability or is the slump predominantly a confidence issue?

* Should Martin O’Neill be more willing to persevere with Big Alfie, N’Diaye, because for all his shortcomings he brings a spark to midfield that no one else currently offers?

* Is it not time to regard Connor Wickham, back from his Sheff Wed loan, as worthy of a run?

* Is MoN pursuing methods that are frankly outdated and what are we to make of his transfer dealings, in particular the men he’s allowed to leave one way or the other?

All these topics and more are covered in a Brains Trust running to almost 50 minutes. It is easy to navigate so that you can listen to snatches, go backwards and forwards at will and even have your say.



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The views from all three are interesting and expressed with deep concern but no hysteria. The feedback, especially at our Facebook group, suggests that anyone who takes the trouble to listen appreciates what he or she hears.

There’s more, including a chat with Craig Coates, who is the Sunderland stats man from Football Manager 2013 website. Our graphics wizard Jake as puzzled and said that part whizzed straight over his head, which he admitted might be a function of age, though he otherwise enjoyed the podcast.

Give it a try …

Monsieur Salut, by Matt
Monsieur Salut, by Matt
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6 thoughts on “Salut! Sunderland podcast: the case for Connor, the decline of Seb”

  1. OOPS!

    The first letter “n”, in the following sentence, should not be there!

    “So, In still have been unable to pause it.”

  2. Hi Phil,

    The play becomes a pause button one you being playing the clip.

    If you wish to go back and forth within the clip, simply click the area on the sound wave at which you want to listen.

    Hope this helps 🙂

    In the next few weeks we’re hoping to get a more permanent host for the podcast which should be a more stable platform.

    • Many thanks for that.

      I went back to it and found how to move between parts of the podcast but the play button had disappeared (with no replacement) and clicking where it had been just moved the sound to that point.

      So, In still have been unable to pause it.

      Because I listened to it all the way through, yesterday, it doesn’t matter for number 3 but I would like to establish how to do it for numbers 4 etc, as I thoroughly enjoyed listening to it.

      What came as a refreshing change from some other podcasts was the way in which subject matter was discussed in an adult, knowledgeable way, with no seeming desire, by the participants, to “score points” off of each other.

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